F-86 Sabre Special Edition CD

Price: $29.95

  • CD contains 9 magazines
  • All in Acrobat PDF format
  • Print a personal copy
  • Allow 1 week for US delivery

October 1975

  • Erich Hartmann, World’s Top Scoring Fighter Ace
  • F-86 Sabre, The Flying Sword
  • Action in Korea

March 1980

  • Typhoon/Tempest/Tornado, Emergence of the British Fighter/Bomber
  • Grumman’s Last Torpedo Bomber
  • Sky Soldiers, War Diary of a Helicopter
  • North American F-86F Sabres

September 1982

  • The F-86 in Korea
  • DC-2 BOmbers
  • Germany’s Arado 234 Jet Bomber

May 1986

  • X-29 Fighter of the Future
  • Kings of MiG Alley
  • F-86 Sabre Aces

October 1992

  • North American F-86 MiG Killers
  • The Canadair Sabre

January 1995

  • Vultee’s BT-13, World’s Premier Basic Trainer
  • 4th Fighter Wing F-86 Sabres, Korean War’s 10-to-1 MiG Masters

January 2004

  • Korean War Cargo Transports
  • XF-103, 10 Years Too Soon?
  • Factory Test Pilots
  • Factory Fresh, The F-86 Dog Sabre

May 2005

  • XF-90, XF-91, XF-92 – Were they really failures?
  • XP-58 Chain Lightning, Son of the P-38
  • Aviation Promotion, includes the F-86H

November 2005

  • X-15 Pilots in Space!
  • Popeye Intercept, F-86D Dog Sabre
  • 80 Years, Schneider Cup Races

BONUS CONTENT!

  • Four official USAF F-86 flight manuals
  • Over 210 photos

F-86 Vital Statistics

F86-DiagramGeneral Characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 37 ft 1 in (11.4 m)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 0 in (11.3 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 1 in (4.5 m)
  • Wing area: 313.4 sq ft (29.11 m²)
  • Empty weight: 11,125 lb (5,046 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 15,198 lb (6,894 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 18,152 lb (8,234 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × General Electric J47-GE-27 turbojet, 5,910 lbf (maximum thrust at 7.950 rpm for five min)with water injection (26.3 kN)
  • Fuel provisions Internal fuel load: 437 US gallons (1,650 L)), Drop tanks: 2×200 US gallons (760 L) JP-4 fuel

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 687 mph (1,106 km/h) at sea level at 14,212 lb (6,447 kg) combat weight
    also reported 678 mph (1,091 km/h) and 599 at 35,000 feet (11,000 m) at 15,352 pounds (6,960 kg). (597 knots (1,106 km/h) at 6446 m, 1,091 and 964 km/h at 6,960 m.)
  • Stall speed: 124 mph (power off) (108 knots (200 km/h))
  • Range: 1,525 mi, (2,454 km)
  • Service ceiling: 49,600 ft at combat weight (15,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 9,000 ft/min at sea level (45.72 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 49.4 lb/ft² (236.7 kg/m²)
  • lift-to-drag: 15.1
  • Thrust/weight: 0.38

Armament

  • Guns: 6 X 0.50 in (12.7 mm) M3 Browning machine guns (1,602 rounds in total)
  • Rockets: variety of rocket launchers; e.g: 2 Matra rocket pods with 18 SNEB 68 mm rockets per pod
  • Bombs: 5,300 lb (2,400 kg) of payload on four external hardpoints, bombs were usually mounted on outer two pylons as the inner pairs were plumbed for 2 200 US gallons (760 L) drop tankswhich gave the Sabre a more useful range. A wide variety of bombs could be carried (max standard loadout being 2 1,000 lb bombs plus two drop tanks), napalm canisters and could have included a tactical nuclear weapon.

Argentina

F-86F
  • C-122 (191-699) – National Aeronautics Museum, Morón, Buenos Aires.

Australia

Airworthy
CA-27 Mk.32
  • A94-983 Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) – restored to flying condition (registered VH-PCM) in the 1980s and grounded in the 1990s; loaned to the Temora Aviation Museum, Temora, New South Wales, where it was again restored to airworthy condition; displayed regularly (registered VH-IPN) since September 2009.
  • A94-352 – Restored and owned by former squadron leader Jeff Trappett, had its second test flight 05/10/2013, also owns CAC CA-18 Mustang Mk.21 A68-118 VH-AGJ
On display
CA-26
  • A94-101 – RAAF Museum, RAAF Base Williams, Point Cook, Victoria; CAC Sabre prototype, first aircraft to fly faster than the speed of sound in Australia.
CA-27 Mk.31
  • A94-901 – Historical Aircraft Restoration Society, Illawarra Regional Airport, New South Wales; first production CAC Sabre.
  • A94-915 – Narromine Aviation Museum, Narromine Airport, New South Wales.
  • A94-935 – Queensland Air Museum, Caloundra, Queensland.
CA-27 Mk.32
  • A94-944 – RAAF Museum, RAAF Base Williams, Point Cook, Victoria.
  • A94-959 – on a pole at Bettles Park, Raymond Terrace.
  • A94-974 – Classic Jets Fighter Museum, Parafield Airport, South Australia.
  • A94-982 – RAAF Museum, RAAF Base Wagga, Forest Hill, New South Wales.
  • A94-989 – Australian National Aviation Museum, Moorabbin Airport, Victoria.
Stored or under restoration
CA-27 Mk.32
  • A94-970 – Australian War Memorial in storage at RAAF Williams, Point Cook, Victoria.Brazil
F-86K
  • 0014 – Museu Aeroespacial in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Canada

Airworthy
CL-13 Sabre Mk. V
  • Golden Hawks – Vintage Wings of Canada, Gatineau-Ottawa Executive Airport, Quebec
On display
CL-13 Sabre Mk. I
  • Alberta Aviation Museum in Edmonton, Alberta.
CL-13 Sabre Mk. V
  • Atlantic Canada Aviation Museum, Enfield, Nova Scotia.
  • RCAF Memorial Museum,[12] Trenton, Ontario.
  • Community Gardens, Trenton, Ont, Golden Hawks colours, on pole, Trenton, Ontario.
  • Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario, on pole, Kingston, Ontario.
  • Oshawa Airport (gate guard on pole back entrance), Oshawa, Ontario.
  • Germain Park, Sarnia, Ont, Golden Hawks colours, on pole,(under restoration)Sarnia, Ontario.
  • Blockhouse Island, Brockville, Ont, Golden Hawks colours, on pole, Brockville, Ontario.
  • Peterborough Riverview Park & Zoo, on pole, refurbished 2009, Peterborough, Ontario
  • Belleville Centennial Park, Ont, Golden Hawks colours, on pole, Belleville, Ontario.
CL-13 Sabre Mk VI
  • 1815 – Western Canada Aviation Museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Was the final CL-13 airframe built by Canadair.
  • 23060 – Army, Navy and Air force Veterans Club #302 – 9831 – 4th Street, Sidney, B.C.
  • 23651 Golden Hawks – Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, John C. Munro International Airport, Hamilton, Ontario
  • Western Canada Aviation Museum, Winnipeg.
  • Reynolds Alberta Museum, Wetaskiwin, Alberta.

Colombia

On display
  • A Canadair CL-13B Mk.6 in the El Dorado Airport.
  • A Canadair CL-13B Mk.6 in the Cali Air Base.
  • A ex Venezuelan Air Force F-86K in the Palanquero Air Base

Germany

F-86
  • D-9542 – Luftwaffenmuseum der Bundeswehr, Berlin-Gatow.
  • JA-111 – Luftwaffenmuseum der Bundeswehr, Berlin-Gatow.

Greece

F-86D
  • s/n 51-8404 (c/n 173-537)- Athens War Museum.

New Zealand

CA-27 Mk.31
  • A94-922 – under restoration to fly at Ardmore Airport, Auckland, for a private collector in the USA.

Norway

F-86F
  • 52-5069 – Forsvarets flysamling Gardermoen, Oslo Airport, Gardermoen near Oslo.
  • 53-1082 – Flyhistorisk Museum, Sola, Stavanger Airport, Sola, near Stavanger.
F-86K
  • 54-1266 – Flyhistorisk Museum, Sola, Stavanger Airport, Sola, near Stavanger.
  • 54-1274 – Forsvarets flysamling Gardermoen, Oslo Airport, Gardermoen near Oslo.
  • 54-1290 – Forsvarets flysamling Gardermoen, Oslo Airport, Gardermoen near Oslo.

Saudi Arabia

F-86F
  • Royal Saudi Air Force Museum, Riyadh.

Serbia/Yugoslavia

F-86D

14102, ex-USAF 52-10023, c/n 190-748- Museum of Aviation, Belgrade.

F-86E
  • 11054, ex-RCAF 19539, ex-RAF XB636, ex-USAF 52-19539, c/n 439 – Museum of Aviation, Belgrade.
  • 11088, ex-RCAF 19738, ex-RAF XB875, ex-USAF 53-19738, c/n 638 – Museum of Aviation, Belgrade.
  • 11025, ex-RCAF 19856, ex-RAF XB649, ex-USAF 53-19856, c/n 756 – Museum of Aviation, Belgrade.

South Africa

Airworthy
CL-13B Mk6
  • 367 “E” – stored at South African Air Force Museum, AFB Swartkop, Pretoria.
On display
CL-13B Mk6
  • 361 “F” – South African Air Force Museum, AFB Swartkop, Pretoria.

South Korea

On Display
F-86D
  • 51-2910 – USAF 51st Fighter Wing area, Osan Air Base, South Korea

Spain

On display
  • F-86F C.5-82 at Torrejón, Spain.
  • F-86F C.5-58 at Museo del Aire de Cuatro Vientos, Spain.
  • F-86F C.5-175 at Museo del Aire de Cuatro Vientos, Spain.
  • F-86F C.5-231 at Morón, Spain.
  • F-86F C.5-101 at Valencia, Spain

United Kingdom

Airworthy
F-86A
  • 48-0242 – Imperial War Museum Duxford, England.
On Display
F-86D

51-2910 – Osan Air Base, South Korea.

Canadair Sabre 4
  • XB812 – Royal Air Force Museum Cosford.
F-86D
  • 51-6171 – North East Aircraft Museum, Sunderland. It is the only ‘D’ model left in the UK.

United States

Airworthy
F-86A
  • 48-0178 – Heritage Air LCC in Grove, Oklahoma.
  • 49-1217 – Flying Heritage Collection in Everett, Washington.
F-86F
  • 51-13417 – Mid-Atlantic Air Museum in Reading, Pennsylvania.
  • 52-4608 – Robert Scott in Gilroy, California.
  • 52-4666 – Comanche Fighter LCC in Houston, Texas.
  • 52-4731 – Texas Air Command Museum Inc. in Grand Prairie, Texas.
  • 52-4959 (painted as 53-1201) – Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum, Space Coast Regional Airport in Titusville, Florida.
  • 52-4986 – Warbird Heritage Foundation Inc. in Waukegan, Illinois.
  • 52-5012 – Planes of Fame Museum in Chino, California.
  • 52-5116 – Commemorative Air Force in Midland, Texas.
  • 52-5139 – Heritage Aircraft Sales Inc. in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Canadair CL-13 Mk.5
  • RCAF23208 – Richard G. Sugden in Wilson, Wyoming.
  • RCAF23285 – Robert R. Green in Belgrade, Montana.
  • RCAF23293 – Cavanaugh Flight Museum in Addison, Texas.
  • RCAF23330 – EAA Airventure Museum in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
  • RCAF23338 – GCM Air Group LLC in Carson City, Nevada.
  • RCAF23363 – Museum of Flight in Seattle, Washington.
Canadair CL-13 Mk.6
  • RCAF23671 – Commanche Fighters LLC in Houston, Texas. It is painted as Hell-Er Bust X with the s/n of 51-2756.
  • RCAF23688 – War Eagles Air Museum in Santa Teresa, New Mexico.
  • RCAF23697 – Albert C. Hansen in Mojave, California.
  • RCAF23700 – Tennessee Museum of Aviation in Luttrell, Tennessee.
  • S6-1675 – Richard G. Sugden in Wilson, Wyoming.
  • S6-1710 – Lewis Air Legends in San Antonio, Texas.
On display
F-86A
  • 47-0605 – Lackland AFB, San Antonio, Texas.
  • 47-0615 – Octave Chanute Aerospace Museum (former Chanute AFB), Illinois; On loan from the United States Air Force Museum.
  • 48-0260 – National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC.
  • 49-1301 (displayed as 51-2760) – Maxwell Air Force Base Air Park, Alabama.
  • 49-1067 (displayed as 49-1236) – National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio.
F-86D
  • 50-0477 (display as 52-3863 Dennis the Menace) – National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio.
  • 51-2993 – Battleship Memorial Park, Mobile, Alabama.
  • 51-5891 – Savannah International Airport, Georgia.
  • 51-5938 – Appleton, Wisconsin.[
  • 51-6071 – Davis Monthan AFB Warrior Park, Tucson, Arizona.
  • 51-6261 – Chandler City Park, Chandler, Arizona.
  • 52-3651 – Middle Georgia Regional Airport, Macon, Georgia.
  • 52-3653 – Camp Robinson, Little Rock, Arkansas.
  • 52-3669 – McChord Air Museum, McChord Air Force Base, Washington.
  • 52-3735 – Crete, Nebraska.
  • 52-3770 – Camp Mabry (Texas Army National Guard / Texas Air National Guard base), Austin, Texas.
  • 52-3784 – Palm View Park, West Covina, California
  • 52-4043 – 45th Infantry Division Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
  • 52-4239 – Inde Motorsport Ranch, Willcox, Arizona.
  • 52-10052 – Crane Park in Monroe, New York.
  • 52-10057 – Valdosta, Georgia.
  • 52-10115 – Chandler, Arizona.
  • 52-10133 (displayed as 51-0133) – Tyndall AFB, Florida.
  • 53-0704 – Travis AFB, California.
  • 53-0750 – Iowa City Municipal Airport, Iowa.
  • 53-1060 – Yankee Air Museum, Belleville, Michigan.
  • 53-1061 – near Interstate 55, Hazlehurst, Mississippi.
  • 53-1064 – McEntire Air National Guard Base, South Carolina.
F-86E
  • 50-0600 – Pima Air & Space Museum, adjacent to Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, Arizona.
  • 51-2832 – Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
  • 51-2841 – Hickam AFB, Hawaii.
  • 51-13010 – Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada.
  • 51-13064 – Air Power Park, Hampton, Virginia.
  • 52-2844 – Illinois Air National Guard Base, Springfield, Illinois.
F-86F
  • 51-13371 – New England Air Museum, Windsor Locks, Connecticut.
  • 51-13390 – Air Classics Museum, Aurora, Illinois.
  • 52-4978 – Hill Aerospace Museum, Hill AFB, Utah.
  • 52-5143 – Air Zoo, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
  • 52-5323 – Luke AFB, Arizona.
  • 52-5434 – Clay County Courthouse in Brazil, Indiana.
  • 52-5513 (displayed as 51-2831) – Air Force Armament Museum, Eglin AFB, Florida.
  • 55-03818 – Sky Harbor Air National Guard Base, Phoenix Airport, Phoenix, Arizona.
RF-86F
  • 52-4492 – National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.
F-86H
  • 52-1993 – EAA AirVenture Museum, Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
  • 52-5737 – Veterans Memorial Park, Burlington Township, New Jersey.
  • 52-5747 (displayed as 53-1483) – Langley AFB, Virginia.
  • 53-1230 – Castle Air Museum, former Castle AFB, Atwater, California.
  • 53-1239 – Barnes Air National Guard Base, Westfield, Massachusetts. It was on display at the Pate Museum of Transportation in Cresson, Texas before that museum shutdown.
  • 53-1250 – Flying Cloud Airport, Eden Prairie, Minnesota.
  • 53-1251 – Cannon AFB Memorial Park, Cannon AFB, New Mexico.
  • 53-1253 – Jamestown Regional Airport, North Dakota.
  • 53-1296 – Greater Wilmington Airport/New Castle Air National Guard Base, Delaware.
  • 53-1302 – South Dakota Air and Space Museum, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota.
  • 53-1304 – March Field Air Museum, March ARB(former March AFB), Riverside, California.
  • 53-1308 – Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum, former Lowry AFB, Denver, Colorado.
  • 53-1337 – American Legion Post 34, Shortsville, New York.
  • 53-1338 – Beaver County Airport, Pennsylvania.
  • 53-1352 – National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio.
  • 53-1370 – Goldsboro, North Carolina.
  • 53-1372 – Hettinger, North Dakota.
  • 53-1375 – Strategic Air & Space Museum, adjacent to Offutt AFB, Ashland, Nebraska.
  • 53-1386 – McEntire Air National Guard Base, South Carolina.
  • 53-1511 – Museum of Aviation, Robins AFB, Georgia.
  • 53-1525 – Pima Air & Space Museum, adjacent to Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, Arizona.
F-86L
  • 50-0560 – March Field Air Museum, March ARB (former March AFB), Riverside, California.
  • 51-6055 – Hill Aerospace Museum, Hill AFB, Utah
  • 51-6144 – American Legion Post 29, Sherman, Texas.
  • 52-4191 – Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
  • 53-0782 – Peterson Air and Space Museum, Peterson AFB, Colorado Springs, Colorado.
  • 53-0965 – Pima Air & Space Museum, adjacent to Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, Arizona.
  • 53-1030 – NAS Fort Worth JRB (former Carswell AFB), Fort Worth, Texas
Canadair CL-13 Mk.5
  • RCAF23226 – Former England AFB, Louisiana .
  • RCAF23231 – Joe Davies Heritage Airpark at Palmdale Plant 42, Palmdale, California .

North American F-86

  • XF-86 – three prototypes, originally designated XP-86, North American model NA-140
  • YF-86A – this was the first prototype fitted with a General Electric J47 turbojet engine.
  • F-86A – 554 built, North American model NA-151 (F-86A-1 block and first order of A-5 block) and NA-161 (second F-86A-5 block)
  • DF-86A – A few F-86A conversions as drone directors
  • RF-86A – 11 F-86A conversions with three cameras for reconnaissance
  • F-86B – 188 ordered as upgraded A-model with wider fuselage and larger tires but delivered as F-86A-5, North American model NA-152
  • F-86C – original designation for the YF-93A, two built, 48–317 & 48–318,[63] order for 118 cancelled, North American model NA-157
  • YF-86D – prototype all-weather interceptor originally ordered as YF-95A, two built but designation changed to YF-86D, North American model NA-164
  • F-86D/L – Production transonic all-weather search-radar equipped interceptor originally designated F-95A, 2,506 built. The F-86D had only 25 percent commonality with other Sabre variants, with a larger fuselage, larger afterburning engine, and a distinctive nose radome. Sole armament was Mk. 4 unguided rockets instead of machine guns. F-86Ls were upgraded F-86Ds. See North American F-86D Sabre.
  • F-86E – Improved flight control system and an “all-flying tail” (This system changed to a full power-operated control with an “artificial feel” built into the aircraft’s controls to give the pilot forces on the stick that were still conventional, but light enough for superior combat control. It improved high-speed maneuverability); 456 built, North American model NA-170 (F-86E-1 and E-5 blocks), NA-172, essentially the F-86F airframe with the F-86E engine (F-86E-10 and E-15 blocks); 60 of these built by Canadair for USAF (F-86E-6)
  • F-86E(M) – Designation for ex-RAF Sabres diverted to other NATO air forces
  • QF-86E – Designation for surplus RCAF Sabre Mk. Vs modified to target drones
  • F-86F – Uprated engine and larger “6–3” wing without leading edge slats, 2,239 built; North American model NA-172 (F-86F-1 through F-15 blocks), NA-176 (F-86F-20 and ?25 blocks), NA-191 (F-86F-30 and ?35 blocks), NA-193 (F-86F-26 block), NA-202 (F-86F-35 block), NA-227 (first two orders of F-86F-40 blocks comprising 280 aircraft which reverted to leading edge wing slats of an improved design), NA-231 (70 in third F-40 block order), NA-238 (110 in fourth F-40 block order), and NA-256 (120 in final F-40 block order); 300 additional airframes in this series assembled by Mitsubishi in Japan for Japanese Air Self-Defense Force. Sabre Fs had much improved high-speed agility, coupled with a higher landing speed of over 145 mph (233 km/h). The F-35 block had provisions for a new task: the nuclear tactical attack with one of the new small “nukes” (“second generation” nuclear ordnance). The F-40 had a new slatted wing, with a slight decrease of speed, but also a much better agility at high and low speed with a landing speed reduced to 124 mph (200 km/h). The USAF upgraded many of previous F versions to the F-40 standard.
  • F-86F-2 – Designation for 10 aircraft modified to carry the M39 cannon in place of the M3 .50 caliber machine gun “six-pack”. Four F-86E and six F-86F were production-line aircraft modified in October 1952 with enlarged and strengthened gun bays, then flight tested at Edwards Air Force Base and the Air Proving Ground at Eglin Air Force Base in November. Eight were shipped to Japan in December, and seven forward-deployed to Kimpo Airfield as “Project GunVal” for a 16-week combat field trial in early 1953. Two were lost to engine compressor stalls after ingesting excessive propellant gases from the cannons.[64] [N 3]
  • QF-86F – About 50 former Japan Self-Defense Forces (JASDF) F-86F airframes converted to drones for use as targets by the U.S. Navy
  • RF-86F – Some F-86F-30s converted with three cameras for reconnaissance; also 18 Japan Self-Defense Forces (JASDF) aircraft similarly converted
  • TF-86F – Two F-86F converted to two-seat training configuration with lengthened fuselage and slatted wings under North American model NA-204
  • YF-86H – Extensively redesigned fighter-bomber model with deeper fuselage, uprated engine, longer wings and power-boosted tailplane, two built as North American model NA-187
  • F-86H – Production model, 473 built, with Low Altitude Bombing System (LABS) and provision for nuclear weapon, North American model NA-187 (F-86H-1 and H-5 blocks) and NA-203 (F-86H-10 block)
  • QF-86H – Target conversion of 29 airframes for use at United States Naval Weapons Center
  • F-86J – Single F-86A-5-NA, 49-1069, flown with Orenda turbojet under North American model NA-167 – same designation reserved for A-models flown with the Canadian engines but project not proceeded with

North American FJ Fury

CAC Sabre (Australia)

Two types based on the U.S. F-86F were built under licence by the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation (CAC) in Australia, for the Royal Australian Air Forceas the CA-26 (one prototype) and CA-27 (production variant). The RAAF operated the CA-27 from 1956 to 1971. Ex-RAAF Avon Sabres were operated by the Royal Malaysian Air Force (TUDM) between 1969 and 1972. From 1973 to 1975, 23 Avon Sabres were donated to the Indonesian Air Force (TNI-AU); five of these were ex-Malaysian aircraft.

The CAC Sabres included a 60% fuselage redesign, to accommodate the Rolls-Royce Avon Mk 26 engine, which had roughly 50% more thrust than the J47, as well as 30 mm Aden cannons and AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles. As a consequence of its powerplant, the Australian-built Sabres are commonly referred to as the Avon Sabre. CAC manufactured 112 of these aircraft.

CA-27 marques:

  • Mk 30 – 21 built, wing slats, Avon 20 engine.
  • Mk 31 – 21 built, 6–3 wing, Avon 20 engine.
  • Mk 32 – 69 built, four wing pylons, F-86F fuel capacity, Avon 26 engine.

Canadair Sabre

The F-86 was also manufactured by Canadair in Canada as the CL-13 Sabre to replace its de Havilland Vampires, with the following production models:

  • Sabre Mk 1 – one built, prototype F-86A
  • Sabre Mk 2 – 350 built, F-86E-type, 60 to USAF, three to RAF, 287 to RCAF
  • Sabre Mk 3 – one built in Canada, test-bed for the Orenda jet engine
  • Sabre Mk 4 – 438 built, production Mk 3, 10 to RCAF, 428 to RAF as Sabre F 4
  • Sabre Mk 5 – 370 built, F-86F-type with Orenda engine, 295 to RCAF, 75 to Luftwaffe
  • Sabre Mk 6 – 655 built, 390 to RCAF, 225 to Luftwaffe, six to Colombia and 34 to South Africa

Production Summary

  • North American Aviation built a total of 6,297 F-86s and 1,115 FJs,
  • Canadair built 1,815,
  • Australian CAC built 112,
  • Fiat built 221, and
  • Mitsubishi built 300;
  • for a total Sabre/Fury production of 9,860.